For the continued publication of critical writing and the essay form in Glasgow.
About Info, Contact  /  Contributors Text, Art  /  Programme 

Editors Letter (iii)
















Dear Reader,


As numbers go, three is a relatively small one. But given the chaos that invariably accompanies each issue of ARG you might forgive us for being mildly surprised for reaching our third.




Secretly we think our unprofessionalism and ad hoc financial situation to be somewhat charming. We think that stapling these pages together hours before a launch party gives us a certain je ne sais quoi - we may be wrong. However, there are benefits that come with deadlines as fluid as ours.




It means that good writing is put first and foremost, and that the work that goes into doing it is given time. It means allowing writers autonomy so that they have space to digress, to work things out on a page, that it’s fine if the place they end up is not the place they said they would, and the when can always be pushed back. For you, the reader, it means the opinions given to you here are investigated, not stated. And for this we think that time taken demands time given.  




Themed issues have never really been our thing. In this one however, many of the articles intentionally emerged from conversations with participants in Glasgow International. We like to think of this less as a theme and more a microcosm through which we can critique issues that are ever-present in the unavoidably termed ‘art world’. Rachel Boyd’s interview with the In Kind project explores their research into the invisible taxonomies of often unpaid labour that support a festival such as this. A few weeks ago Colm and I were lucky enough to talk to Lubaina Himid whilst she was up visiting Glasgow International - a conversation which has become a far-reaching essay by Colm. Fittingly, we also have an interview with the man in charge, GI 2018 festival director Richard Parry, written by Loll Junggeburth.




GI’s got me thinking about art and money - and how the latter permeates what is on the walls and who is putting it up. Art’s space is a political one and it is important to realise your place even when you have a print run of 200. I turn to Hito Steyerl who when referring to the art market might as well be talking about ARG when she writes:


‘This mess is kept afloat by the sheer dynamism of loads and loads of hardworking women’ (and I guess also Colm).




Enjoy,


Martha

June 2018



———————EDITORS—ISSUE 3———————

Colm Guo-Lin Peare (Founding), Martha Horn (Founding), Marion Eele (at Large), Siri Black (Copy)

Copyright Art Review Glasgow 2019. All Rights Reserved.